Making art out of traffic electrical boxes

Local artists add more art to Alameda Corridor

Joseph Rios
jrios@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 2/11/20

Tom Quinn visualizes the Alameda Corridor in Lakewood being a destination for Lakewood residents and the surrounding region. He wants it to be a place where people come to ride their bikes, walk, …

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Making art out of traffic electrical boxes

Local artists add more art to Alameda Corridor

Posted

Tom Quinn visualizes the Alameda corridor in Lakewood being a destination for Lakewood residents and the surrounding region. He wants it to be a place where people come to ride their bikes, walk, recreate, build their local businesses and enjoy themselves.

Part of achieving that vision includes adding art to an unnamed arts and nature trail that runs from Kipling to Sheridan along Alameda.

Finished at the beginning of the month, 12 of Lakewood’s traffic electrical boxes were wrapped up with vinyl on Alameda from Depew to Garrison with art from five local artists and three artists who are based in Wyoming. The concept of the project was to decorate the boxes with nature-themed artwork.

“When you have a lot of good local artists like we do, I think it’s important to make use of their talent rather than reaching outside,” said Quinn, executive director of Alameda Connects, a nonprofit that promotes the Alameda Corridor.

Craig Rouse and Carrie MaKenna, who are married and live in Lakewood, each designed two art pieces for the boxes. The couple owns the Landt-MaKenna Galleries studio at the 40 West Arts District and have their art on display throughout Lakewood, including at Lasley Park and Green Gables Park.

Among the couple’s designs along Alameda for the boxes include a piece created by Rouse that features Colorado fish like trout and bluegill swimming in an aquarium and a design that showcases the different ways Coloradans get around town during the summer like skateboarding, cycling and jogging — created by MaKenna.

“Anytime there’s artwork around, it brightens people’s day. It makes them look and see and think about things,” said MaKenna. “This is the practicality (of the Alameda traffic electrical boxes), but one of the things it does is keep graffiti off of these things. It helps to keep the neighborhood clean and beautiful for the people that live there.”

With the addition of 12 pieces of art, the Alameda Corridor is now home to 29 different pieces of art, Quinn said. The project was funded by the Alameda Corridor Business Improvement District.

“The redevelopment of that entire area of the new bike path, the new landscaping that they’ve done — I think it’s just going to enhance that experience that people will have. Hopefully (the traffic electrical boxes) will draw more people to enjoy it, rather than drive by it,” said Rouse. “It’s nice to be able to use the blank canvasses of these metal boxes and to supply some refreshing graphics on them that are bright and colorful.”

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