Colorado Mountain Fest offers opportunities to get your outdoor adventure on

Two-day festival on Sept. 28 and 29 benefits the Colorado Mountain Club

Posted 9/26/19

In July 2016, Maddie Miller of Denver embarked on what she described as a crazy adventure. It was the kind of adventure that along the way, Miller learned a lot about herself, fostered a special bond …

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Colorado Mountain Fest offers opportunities to get your outdoor adventure on

Two-day festival on Sept. 28 and 29 benefits the Colorado Mountain Club

Posted

In July 2016, Maddie Miller of Denver embarked on what she described as a crazy adventure.

It was the kind of adventure that along the way, Miller learned a lot about herself, fostered a special bond with a few people and made unique, lasting memories.

Forty-one days, 16 hours and 10 minutes after starting that adventure, Miller, along with her mountain mentor Melissa Arnot of Washington state, became the world record holder for the speed ascent of climbing all of the nation’s 50 high points consecutively.

Miller, now 24, is excited to share the stories from her 50 Peaks Challenge with attendees of Colorado Mountain Club’s Colorado Mountain Fest.

“What you learn in the mountains goes far beyond technical skills,” Miller said. “I hope they (her audience) will take away that they’re capable of achieving any outdoor dream they set their mind to.”

Colorado Mountain Fest takes place Sept. 28 and 29 at the American Mountaineering Center in Golden. It features a main festival with an expo and vendor village that includes demos, athlete meet-and-greets, mountain-related games and activities, food trucks and an Odell kombucha and craft beer garden; educational seminars; a yoga class; clinics; a film festival; and a Mini-Mountain Fest for children.

“The idea behind the event is to empower Coloradans to take on their next outdoor adventure,” said Maryjane Jarvis, manager for Colorado Mountain Club’s major events. “And to celebrate the outdoor community as a whole.”

The festival and educational seminars part of Colorado Mountain Fest are free and open to the public. More than 20 seminars are being offered throughout the two days of the festival. All are outdoor topics ranging from avalanche awareness to backcountry cuisine. Morning Flow Yoga, presented by prAna, is also free.

The clinics, Mini-Mountain Fest and film festival are the event’s paid attractions. There are about 20 different outdoor clinics being offered, which will be hands-on activities that take place off-site, but most are within walking distance of the American Mountaineering Center. Clinics are geared toward people with beginner to intermediate outdoor skills and categories include self-rescue, various intro courses, photography and more.

Colorado Mountain Fest is an opportunity for Colorado Mountain Club to help “remove barriers and provide the information and tools so people can safely break into new mountain sports and activities,” Jarvis said.

The Mini-Mountain Fest will be hosted by Colorado Mountain Club’s Youth Education Program and is offered for school-age children in grades two through five. Mountain-themed games and activities include slacklining, Colorado wildlife education, scavenger hunts and climbing in the Colorado Mountain Club’s Bouldering Bus. The Mini-Mountain Fest serves two purposes, Jarvis said. It will be an opportunity for children to be entertained and have fun, but it is also an opportunity for adults to leave the kids in a supervised environment so the adults can participate in the various clinics and/or attend the seminars that Colorado Mountain Fest offers.

Two adventure films will be part of the film festival. They are “Mixtress” and “A Line Across the Sky.” Dawn Glanc, a climbing athlete who lives in Ouray, will be presenting “Mixtress.”

Colorado Mountain Fest is a fundraiser for Colorado Mountain Club, which got its start in 1912, and now has about 6,500 members who are spread across Colorado. The nonprofit provides social, recreational and educational programs, as well as opportunities to get involved with stewardship and land conservation advocacy.

While Miller is looking forward to sharing the anecdotes and details of her 50 Peaks Challenge at Colorado Mountain Fest, she is also excited to meet people and hear the stories from their various outdoor adventures, she said.

“Colorado Mountain Fest is an opportunity to find an outdoor community,” Miller said, “as well as learn new skills and introduce yourself to new (outdoor) challenges.”

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