Caring for a loved one at home with COVID-19

Centura Health offers guidelines to help prevent spread of virus

Staff report
Posted 4/7/20

Learning that a family member or roommate has symptoms or even a positive test result for the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) can feel concerning. Centura wants to help ease any discomfort for those …

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Caring for a loved one at home with COVID-19

Centura Health offers guidelines to help prevent spread of virus

Posted

Learning that a family member or roommate has symptoms or even a positive test result for the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) can feel concerning. Centura wants to help ease any discomfort for those caring for someone at home, by sharing some guidelines to help protect all those in your home.

“By focusing on preventing the spread of germs, we can help stop the spread of COVID-19,” Dr. Andrew French, chief medical officer for Centura-St. Anthony North Health Campus, said in a news release. “If you find yourself in the role of a caregiver to someone who is sick with COVID-19 or any infectious illness, there are some precautions you can take to protect the rest of your household members while comforting the one who is presently sick.”

According to the news release, the Center for Disease Control encourages those caring for a person in home isolation to practice the following:

* Have the person stay in one room, away from other people, including yourself, as much as possible. If possible, have them use a separate bathroom, and avoid sharing personal household items such as dishes, towels and bedding.

* If facemasks are available, have the person wear a facemask when they are around people, including you.

* Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after interacting with the sick person.

* Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.

* Every day, clean surfaces such as counters, tabletops and doorknobs.

* Wash laundry thoroughly.

* Avoid having unnecessary visitors.

In addition, to help comfort the sick member of your home, make sure he or she drinks a lot of fluids to stay hydrated and rests at home.

Over-the-counter medicines may help with symptoms. For most people, symptoms last a few days and get better after a week.

For additional questions, contact the patient’s healthcare provider or state or local health department.

If your loved one is having trouble breathing, seek medical attention. Call your doctor or emergency room before going in and tell them your symptoms. They will tell you what to do.

In all cases, follow the guidance of your healthcare provider and local health department. The decision to stop home isolation should be made in consultation with your healthcare provider.

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