Sharing stories and goals for future care

Kate LA Beau
Posted 2/22/18

Usually this space is reserved for grandchildren’s care. This time Kate LA Beau, an Advance Care Planning Program Manager is a guest writer addressing grandparent’s needs and future care. …

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Sharing stories and goals for future care

Posted

Usually this space is reserved for grandchildren’s care. This time Kate LA Beau, an Advance Care Planning Program Manager is a guest writer addressing grandparent’s needs and future care. Prepared grandparents who communicate their wishes while there is time help loved ones follow those wishes and give everyone peace.

Now is a perfect time to share a personal story made up of the many experiences and choices best told by us. We know best what it is that helps us get through bumpy times.

Every one of us has a personal story of traditions, family stories, faith, and values we choose to honor and pass on. When grandparents share ideas, goals, and concerns, it is a tremendous and heartfelt loving gift and relief for those who care about us.

Sometimes we don’t tell our story to the people who might be asked to take care of us when we are very ill. Letting others hear what is important to us, who we care about, where we find comfort, and when we need help, gives them the information they need to take care of us. In times of emergencies, knowing how to take care of us will reduce the stress for all.  

We can share in ways both our families and healthcare workers can follow. Telling our story is the first step to planning our future medical care, too.  Sharing now will let others know and honor those choices later when we cannot speak for ourselves. 

Taking Time

Take part of your day to share with a person or several in your family some of those cherished traditions, beliefs, and hopes. Write down a few phrases to get you started on the topics you want and need to discuss while you are healthy.

Community health organizations also have certified Advance Care Planning (ACP) facilitators to help you translate the story into the medical language your doctor and future care providers need. They also have sheets of questions to guide you. Their service is generally free.

Prepare to spend time talking with someone important to you while leaving the busy-ness of the day at the door.

Preparation

Gather important pictures, documents, and lists. Bring a willingness to give love ones a gift of information and peace of mind. What do you want done with possessions? What should happen to pets? Are documents, medical, and religious decisions up to date? Where are they? What information is needed for an obituary? What wisdom do you want to pass on? Do you want to record a message for posterity on their phone? What do you want done with your body?

Stay in control of your future care and well-being. Why leave it to loved ones to make hard decisions? Grieving is hard enough. Grandparentsteachtoo.blogspot.com and wnmufm/Learning Through the Seasons.

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