My Name Is

My Name Is: Sylvia Scott

Founder of Girl’s C.E.O. Connection

Posted 12/4/17

About me I grew up in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I graduated from the University of Tulsa with a degree in B.S. with a marketing and retail emphasis. From 2006 to 2007 I attended Babson College in …

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My Name Is

My Name Is: Sylvia Scott

Founder of Girl’s C.E.O. Connection

Posted

About me

I grew up in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I graduated from the University of Tulsa with a degree in B.S. with a marketing and retail emphasis. From 2006 to 2007 I attended Babson College in Massachusetts with the goal to receive an MBA with an entrepreneurship emphasis. I didn’t graduate because I moved to California to help my aging mother.

I moved to Lakewood in September 2015 after being away from Colorado for 30 years. My hobbies are sewing apparel and interiors. I am an advocate for advancing the education of Afghan women and girls. In July 2017 I hosted a woman business owner from Kabul in Afghanistan. She spent 5 days in Lakewood, and I introduced her to experts and school directors in early childhood education.

Starting Girl’s C.E.O. (Creating Enterprising Organizations)

The mission is to cultivate creativity and innovation with independent thinking of a global community of “Generation Z” high school girls as entrepreneurs. To equip them with proven skills, behaviors, and characteristics of accomplished women entrepreneurs.

This is done through podcasts, virtual and one-on-one mentoring, video interviews of accomplished female entrepreneurs of all ages and backgrounds, and the Realizing a Vision conference. A book by the same name,” Realizing a Vision,” will be released in the spring of 2018.

I was inspired to do it because I witnessed first-hand how entrepreneurship opens the door to self-sufficiency and financial independence. It raises the level of confidence of women, and empowers women to use their talents and strengths to make contributions to their communities.

Women’s Entrepreneurship Day (WED)

WED is an international initiative to celebrate, empower, and support women entrepreneurs. The official date was Nov. 19, and the WED Colorado conference had women entrepreneurs from all stages of growth and business types, business leaders, government officials, and supporters of women in business attending.

The importance and growth of women entrepreneurs in Colorado was highlighted with the impact women entrepreneurs make. It was a day to learn from role models and successful women, to network, and uplift others. All the speakers, panelists, and session leaders participating in our conference were actually being honored because they have made a difference and are role models to follow.

The importance of celebrating women

Celebrating these women ignites a network of women leaders, innovators, and entrepreneurs to initiate startups, drive economic expansion, and advance communities so that women and girls are empowered to become active participants in their economy. For many women business leaders they realize their full potential in being agents of change in their own communities and globally. Celebrating women leaders in the community and business world reinforces their place at the table to collaborate and find solutions in critical areas of entrepreneurship eco-systems, education and policy creation.

Their socioeconomic status, race, and education level do not need to be a deterrent. Keep their eye on the end goal and look for people, groups, and mentors who will support them and their visions. It may take longer than they expect but never give up and don’t look back.

 

If you have suggestions for My Name Is ..., contact Clarke Reader at creader@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

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