Hometown Impressions

For 40 West Market, 13 is the lucky number

Market runs through October

Posted 9/12/17

It would be hard to find a more perfect late summer morning than that of Sept. 2 — the thirteenth 40 West Farmers Market of the summer.

Now in its second year at the Lamar Station Plaza, the market, started by Gene Kalesti, owner of Pure …

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Hometown Impressions

For 40 West Market, 13 is the lucky number

Market runs through October

Posted

It would be hard to find a more perfect late summer morning than that of Sept. 2 — the thirteenth 40 West Farmers Market of the summer.

Now in its second year at the Lamar Station Plaza, the market, started by Gene Kalesti, owner of Pure Colorado Pro’s Kitchen and Event Center, with the support of the West Colfax Community Association and 40 West Arts, is still in the growing phase.

But every bit helps.

“There’s something about markets in Colorado, that the third year is the year they pop,” Kalesti said. “We’ve gotten a little bigger this year, and have some new features people are enjoying.”

At around 11, the free yoga class hosted by Container Collective Yoga and Bikes had just wrapped up — one of the new features to the market this year.

“The class varies from week to week — sometimes the age range is 5 to 80, and sometimes there’s three students, and others more like 13,” said Stephanie Lauck, yoga studio manager and instructor with the Container Collective. “Community involvement is really important to us, and we wanted to get out and know our neighbors.”

Shoppers picked fresh vegetables from the Mountair Park Community Farm and Miller Farms, learned about the Two Creeks Neighborhood Association and Colorado State University Extension, and perused offerings from Red Herring Art Supplies and Melissa Lemmon’s Jams.“We’ve had so much support from the community,” Kalesti said.

The market gives shoppers the opportunity catch up with neighbors, jaw about the coming elections, and share recipes. As they shopped, bluegrass music, courtesy of Golden Strings’ JoAn Crippen and Ron Steerman, floated above the sounds of cars on the busy avenue.

“Everybody loves these guys and what they’re doing here,” said Cat Tarbassian, a local artist with work on display at the nearby Lakewood Arts Council Gallery, who is a regular visitor to the market. “I know right who to go for peaches or anything else I need.”

As more people pulled up to shop, it was obvious by the thirteenth week, things were getting good at the market.

And there’s still six to go.

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